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Meta is under investigation by the EU regarding potential risks to child safety

What you need to know more about

  • Foo Yun Chee, a journalist with extensive experience in agenda-setting and market-moving reporting, authored this piece for Thomson Reuters, drawing on her expertise in European antitrust laws and developments.
  • The company emphasized its commitment to providing safe and age-appropriate experiences and expressed readiness to share further details of its efforts with the European Commission.

EU regulators announced on Thursday that they will be investigating Meta Platforms’ social media platforms, Facebook and Instagram, for potential violations of EU online content regulations concerning child safety. This move, under the Digital Services Act (DSA) implemented last year, underscores the increasing demand for tech companies to take proactive measures against illegal and harmful content, with potential consequences including significant fines.

The European Commission has announced an in-depth investigation into Facebook and Instagram over concerns that they haven’t sufficiently addressed risks to children. Meta submitted a risk assessment report in September, but the Commission remains concerned that both platforms, including their algorithms, could potentially encourage behavioral addictions and contribute to what’s known as “rabbit-hole effects” among children.

The European Commission has expressed concerns about Meta’s age-assurance and verification methods, particularly regarding children accessing inappropriate content. Meta responded by highlighting its existing arsenal of over 50 tools and policies aimed at safeguarding young users online. The company emphasized its commitment to providing safe and age-appropriate experiences and expressed readiness to share further details of its efforts with the European Commission.

This scrutiny adds to Meta’s existing challenges in the EU, including concerns over election disinformation ahead of crucial European Parliament elections. Violations of the Digital Services Act (DSA) can result in fines of up to 6% of a company’s annual global turnover.

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The Technology Roundup newsletter delivers the latest news and trends directly to your inbox. Foo Yun Chee, a journalist with extensive experience in agenda-setting and market-moving reporting, authored this piece for Thomson Reuters, drawing on her expertise in European antitrust laws and developments.

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